There is a correlation between graffiti in matatus and crime

Uhuru Kenyatta recently overruled an earlier ban on graffiti on PSVs. This rule had been imposed in 2003 by then transport minister, the late John Michuki. While the reasons for Michuki’s decision same weren’t clear, I see the reason now.

The ruling, which was more of a roadside declaration than a ruling, came as welcome news to most people. Heck, who doesn’t love to see spiderman splattered across their favorite jav?

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This is where we go wrong.

Question: why do kids in primary and high schools wear uniform? Because it’s cheaper? Because it looks better than jeans and sneakers?

No. They wear uniform for one simple reason: Uniformity breeds Discipline.

Don’t take my word for it.

Let’s group the orderlies vs the artsies. The orderlies here are Double M, KBS and city hoppa while the artsies are the likes of ‘Teflon Don’, ‘Grillz’, ‘G-Five’, ‘Mambo Mbaya’ e.t.c.

Now, what’s your experience with these two sets of group? Chances  are high you’ve been robbed/harrased/ had a mishap with either fellow passengers or the conductors of the artsies.

Who’s to blame?
So where does the problem lie? Is it with the management of the buses – by employing unruly touts or drivers?
It’s a psychological problem: these nganya’s, by mere virtue of their graffiti, speak of chaos. And anybody who calls this chaos art needs to redefine art.
 I think the problem lies smack with the art, or lack of it there of.
Uniformity breeds discipline. And the vice versa holds.

With all been said and done, here’s something to cheer up your day:

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